What is MSPSL?

MSPSL

What is MSPSL? A Quick Discussion with Pete from Drive4Life

 

MSPSL is the term used when driving around on the roads and you’re about to make a turn or impede other drivers on the road. They are rules to follow and you will learn them over the course of your driving lessons, failing to follow MSPSL will result in you failing your practical driving test. So what is MSPSL? Well it stands for MIRRORS SIGNAL POSITION SPEED LOOK and bellow are just what these mean;

 MSPSL

Mirrors: The appropriate mirrors must be checked on the approach to any junction type. The main interior mirror initially, followed by the wing mirror of the direction that you are turning (left would be left wing mirror, whilst right, would be right win mirror).

 

Signal: Once you have checked your mirrors it’s time to let the other drivers & pedestrians know what you’re about to do and you will need to indicate in the direction that you want to turn. Not using signals at all or using them too late is dangerous and it could result in a) running a pedestrian over b) a collision with another vehicle.

 

Position: The correct road position must be applied depending on the direction you are turning, the width of the road and if lanes are used. Left turns are usually taken in your normal driving position, taking too close to the left side may result in you hitting the curb. If making a right turn, position the car just to the left of the centre line in the road.

 

Speed: Speed is relevant to the location and situation on the road. The location may be a residential area with a closed junction, this may require a much slower speed than a wide open road with open junctions.

 

Look: Looking refers to all round observation. Before making the turn, it is important that there are no other vehicles moving into your path, cyclists or pedestrians. Turning left often requires a quick final look into the left door mirror before making the turn to make sure there are no cyclists under-taking you.

 

With a lot of practice the MSPSL rule will become second nature and you will have a much better chance in passing your exam. If you are looking for driving lessons in the Runcorn area, but have not yet decided on an instructor, there is nobody better than myself! I can slowly teach you the basics and then implement new ways into them, you’ll be mastering the harder parts in no time at all and you’ll be passing your test in almost a blink of an eye! If you are interested in our lessons, then please don’t hesitate to contact me and I’ll be in touch with you shortly!

How to do uphill starts

How to do uphill starts – A quick article to help you on the roads with Pete from Drive4Life

Today at Drive4Life we will be discussing a number of tips for when you’re trying to do an uphill start. These can be quite tricky as you’re used to finding the bite and releasing the handbrake and just moving. But with starting a car on a hill you need to get the revs to 2000 rpm instead of 1500 rpm. Only doing 1500 will force the car to roll down the hill.

Uphill starts are always included in the practical exam and you won’t be able to avoid them (they’re a massive pain at first, until you get the hang of them). When you have parked up on the left (the examiner will not ask you to park up on the right), apply the handbrake and select neutral, the examiner will then tell you to move off again when you are ready.

speedometerSelect 1st gear and slightly press the accelerator. The usual amount of gas (revs/rpm) needed is around 1500 rpm on the rev counter. You will need slightly more than this for hill starts, around 2000 rpm should do, if you don’t have 2000rpm on the rev counter and you release the handbrake, then the car will start to roll back, this is dangerous and you could fail your test over something so little like this. Although if you start to roll backwards, you haven’t found the bite fully (or your revs are too low), put down the brake and handbrake and start again, although doing this on your test will result in a fail.

You will now need to look into your left blind spot, through all mirrors and finish with the right blind spot. You need to check all mirrors and both blind spots to ensure a pedestrian is not directly crossing behind your vehicle as on a hill start there is a risk of your car rolling back.

If when you move off your car begins to roll back it is essential to take action immediately as failure to do so will result in a failed driving test. You have 2 options; the first is to slightly raise the clutch to prevent rolling back further or immediately depress the clutch followed by the foot brake. The latter option is preferred if you are not too confident with clutch control although it will require you having to start the entire moving off procedure again. When you do start to move you may need to keep the car in lower gears (1st, 2nd etc.) for longer than usual as the engine will require more power to climb the hill in these gears.

If you found this article informative and helpful and you would like to see others like this in the future, then please don’t hesitate to contact us and a member of our friendly team will be in touch with you shortly. Or if you would like to see some of our other articles, like our Recovering from a Stall then click here.

 

Applying for your British Provisional Driving Licence

Applying for a Provisional Driving Licence is that first all important step to learning to drive, but before your application there are several criteria to meet and a few boxes that you’ll need to tick.

To begin with you’ll need to be a resident of Great Britain and knowing your National Insurance Number will certainly speed your application. You’ll also need to have utility bills or letters covering 3 years to prove you’ve been a resident in this country and you’ll also need a valid proof of identity, eg passport.

If you’re merely interested in riding around on a moped or quad bike then at the age of 16 you can do this quite easily. However, if your intention is to drive a car then you must be 17. Apply for it nice and early, before your 16th birthday, then you’ll feel like you’ve got things moving.

You’ll need to meet the minimum eyesight requirement too. If you need to wear glasses for distance you will also need them for driving, a quick visit to the optician will put your mind at rest. They will also ask if you have any eye conditions that prevents you from seeing normally.

Your payment of £50 can be paid either by debit or credit card and this should be sent with your completed D1 form.

The whole process is fairly quick and you should in possession of your very first Provisional Licence within 1 week of your application.

Remember, if your looking for driving lessons, a driving instructor will need to see your licence before you can start learning to drive

20140625-184954-67794775.jpg

 

If you found this article helpful and you would like to see more like this, then please keep checking this blog regurlarly as it’s frequently updated. If you are interested in our Driving Lessons Chester, then please don’t hesitate to get into contact with us and a member of our friendly team will be in touch with you shortly.

Roundabout Tips

Today at Drive4Life we will be discussing tips when navigating roundabouts on the roads. When coming to a roundabout and you notice that your vehicle is approaching the painted triangle in the road (this means it is the start of the roundabout), you will need to apply the brake to around 10mph and then swap down to 2nd gear. If the right is clear and there are no vehicles approaching from the right hand side of the roundabout, then you may just keep going in the correct lane and come off the roundabout as you would normally do. But if you notice there are cars on the right hand side, switch to 1st gear and creep on the roundabout, a full stop may cause an accident, because the person behind you may not be paying attention to you and may also be reading the roundabout and when they see it’s clear they may just try and go as they would be assuming you would be going too.

If you’re unsure what direction the vehicles are going on the roundabout (whether they’re coming off, or staying on) but they don’t have indicators on, then look at the vehicles wheels as this will let you know what direction they are facing which means what direction the other vehicle is going to take.

When on the roundabout and you’re on the outside lane, make sure you take the angle wide enough to let other vehicles use the inside lane(s), once you’ve passed the exit before the one you’re taking off, indicate the way your going and then increase your speed when coming off the roundabout, this ensures that any vehicles behind you now have a gap in between your vehicle and theirs.

If you found this article informative and helpful and you would like to see others like this in the future, then please don’t hesitate to get into contact with us and a member of our friendly team will be in touch with you shortly. If you’re looking for Driving Lessons and you’re based in Widnes, Runcorn or even Chester, then look no further as you’ve just found the best driving school around!